I first noticed Roger Newsome’s work on the International Flat Figure’s Society Forum. The first few photos showed all thefigures in the set with a few painted. Successive photos showed more and more of the figures painted. And finally, he finished and the beautifully painted figures were mounted, single file on a long thin base, with trees on each end.

Roger consented to do a brief write up of his work and to send a series of photos displaying the completed work. He writes:

Prior to the Battle of Leuthen 1757.

King Frederick the Great directing a speech to his generals.The set is 30mm and was edited by Werner Scholtz and it is available from Berliner Zinnfiguren. http://www.zinnfigur.com/product_info.php?&products_id=10001562&osCsid=mn0tpq01jjcmordk0sk5n6gpu4&page=&sort=1d&ID=2566 and consists of 31 pieces, 28 figures and three trees. I was lucky enough to get my set from Ebay.

When I started work on the set I exclusively painted with artists acrylics, however since then I have begunKONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA to use oils.  For the sake of consistency I continued using acrylics through to the end of the project. It’s taken approximately six months to complete, without a doubt it would have been much longer with oils.The painting was done to a standard without too much concern for detailing, the aim was for it to look nice from a reasonable viewing distance. the reason for this is I didn’t want to get bogged down with too much detail, get bored with the project and ultimately put it aside never see it completed.

There were quite a few times when I thought it would never be finished, the halfway point was a bit of a milestone where I knew there was a good chance it would be. I also said to myself I would never take on such a chore again, however now it’s done I am already think of another “biggie”.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Having only painted with acrylics, I asked Roger to tell me more about his experience switching to oils from acrylics. He writes:

I started my flat painting with Andrea & Vallejo paints that I had previously used for conventional figures. I changed to tube acrylics to take advantage of their more vibrant colour and slower drying time. I decided to give oils a go because I couldn’t achieve the effect I wanted when painting shiny surfaces like armour and boots. Rather than splash out on another range of paints I initially chose enough to paint those items. The paints I got are from the W&N Artisan range and are water soluble meaning your brushes etc. can be cleaned in water and the paints can also be thinned with water… no smelly white spirit or thinner in my corner of the dining room where I paint.

It really hasn’t taken long to get to grips with there qualities and find them far easier to use than acrylics. The slower drying time does mean I usually have about half a dozen projects in progress at the same time.

There’s a pretty good run down on them here.

http://www.winsornewton.com/products/oil-colours/artisan-water-mixable-oil-colour/

I asked him a follow-up question: Do you think the color in oils is more vivid that acrylics? And, is using oils like wet blending with acrylics? He writes:

The colour is much more vivid with oils, some colours have a habit of drying gloss but a coat of Humbrol Dull Cote works a treat when the oils have dried. Prussian Blue is the main culprit. The blending is the major advantage over acrylics. There’s some good videos here,http://www.zinnvoll.com/sbs-videos/

Roger has been very accommodating in helping put this post together. I appreciate him and his work and hope those of you who are at a similar stage with me in learning to paint flats well will benefit as I have.

Thanks Roger.

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